The More We Know...

How the Murder of George Floyd Affected American Newsrooms

Derek Chauvin with his knee on the neck of George Floyd. Wikipedia

By Charlotte Dennett

The televised trial of (former) officer Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd has once again brought home how deeply embedded racism is in our “Anglo-Saxon” culture. New video footage of Floyd’s cries for help, accompanied by bystanders’ anguished protests throughout the entire 9 minute and 29 seconds of his painful demise, will hopefully have far-reaching ramifications regarding police reform and legislative actions to redress racist policies in the U.S.

What you may not know is that the demonstrations following George Floyd’s death last summer caused considerable introspection and angst in American newsrooms over an issue that may strike some as relatively trivial, but to editors throughout the U.S. was long overdue and fraught with meaning: whether to capitalize the word “black” in reference to “peoples of African ancestry.” read more

The More We Know...

The More We Know

The More We Know…

…the worse it gets. That’s been the commentary from media pundits and members of Congress since the Trumpers’ assault on the US capitol on January 6th. We now know that members of Congress phoned good-bye messages to loved ones as they lay huddled on the floor of the House chamber before Security was able to whisk them away to safety. The marauders came within minutes of confronting Vice President Pence, accusing him of treason for failing to stop the certification of the November election and vowing to string him up. (One of them was carrying a noose).  A security briefing by the acting Capitol police chief – described by members as” horrific and chilling” – told them their purchase of bullet-proof vests would be compensated. Members of the National Guard are now sleeping on the floors inside the Capitol – somewhat reassuring the lawmakers. read more

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An Important Message to Our Readers

The Toward Freedom Board of Directors welcomes Charlotte Dennett as our Guest Editor.

Charlotte joins us as a seasoned journalist and editor who was recently hailed as “an expert in resource-based politics” by Time magazine for her coverage of politics and resource wars in the Middle East. Her latest book, The Crash of Flight 3804 : A Lost Spy, A Daughter’s Quest, and the Deadly Politics of the Great Game for OiI is an important piece of literature for its historical reporting and personal investigation into the death by plane crash of her father, America’s first master-spy in the Middle East. read more